10 Best Elk Hunting

Updated on: June 2022

Best Elk Hunting in 2022


Primos Hoochie Mama Call

Primos Hoochie Mama Call
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • Accurate and consistent cow call
  • Fool-proof operation: simply push for cow elk sounds
  • Tunable design produces mews, lost cow calls and estrus cow sounds
  • 100 percent freeze proof
  • U.S. Patent nos. 6,575,804 & 5,910,039
  • The most accurate and consistent cow call you-Feetll ever hear
  • Fool-proof operation: simply push for perfect cow elk sounds every time
  • Tunable design produces mews, Lost cow calls and Estrus cow sounds
  • 100% FREEZEPROOF
  • Easy One-Handed Operation

Big And Broken

Big And Broken
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022

The Ultimate Guide to Elk Hunting

The Ultimate Guide to Elk Hunting
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • Array

Primos Elk Hunter's Master Pack Call

Primos Elk Hunter's Master Pack Call
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • 100 percent designed and tested for the toughest situations and environments
  • Super Pack Bugle
  • Hoochie Mama
  • Top Pin
  • MTA Elk Instructional DVD

The Practical Guide To Elk Hunting: Forty Years Of Elk Hunting Lessons

The Practical Guide To Elk Hunting: Forty Years Of Elk Hunting Lessons
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022

Team Work

Team Work
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022

Public Land Elk Hunting (Black & White)

Public Land Elk Hunting (Black & White)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022

Dan Pickar's 2013 Montana Elk

Dan Pickar's 2013 Montana Elk
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022

The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game

The Complete Guide to Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game: Volume 1: Big Game
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022
  • Array

#Projectelk

#Projectelk
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022

Researches Find Key Factor in the Development of Huntington's Disease

Huntington's disease is genetic and belongs to a group of diseases called trinucleotide repeat diseases and it is programed to appear in adulthood.

While there is no cure yet, they do know that it is caused by an extremely rare genetic mutation, a three-letter piece of genetic code becomes repeated over and over again in just one gene.

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute have announced that they have found a mechanism that could be an explanation for the precise timing in the progression of the disease and it may be the discovery that leads in the right direction in the hunt for a prevention or cure.

The number of the code repeats can range from 40 to 70 and more. They have found that they progress like clockwork and therefore, since they are on a precise timetable, it is possible to not only at what age the disease will develop, but also how quickly it will progress.

The prevailing theory has been that a protein fragment that contains the amino acid glutamine which is encoded in the repeating triplet builds up in the cells and eventually reaches toxic levels. But this does not explain all of the clinical data. It does not explain the reason why patients who have two instead of one copy of the gene do not develop the symptoms twice as fast as those with the one copy. In addition, glutamine is not produced in all of the trinucleotide diseases, but in all of the diseases the timing of the progression and the age at which the patient has the onset of the disease is the same, so therefore glutamine is not the common factor.

One of the researchers, a student Shai Kaplan, saw that the answer just might be in the changes in the number of DNA repeats that normally happen in everyone's cells throughout their entire lifetime. The longer the sequence of repeats, the more chance there is of a mutation and they realized that the genes that carry the code for the disease might be getting more than the average DNA repeats until it reaches a critical point.

Using data on 20 of the known trinucleotide repeat diseases, combined with their own knowledge of the mutations, they were able to create a computer simulation that is able to take the number of repeats and come up with the age of the onset as well as the way it progresses.

This model seems to fit with all of the facts and gives an expatiation for the onset and progression of not only Huntington's, but for all of the trinucleotide repeat diseases. It also suggests that a cure for all of them could be in a drug or some other form of treatment that slows down the expansion process.

The lead researchers are Prof. Ehud Shapiro, the incumbent of the Harry Weinrebe Chair of Computer Science and Biology, Dr. Shalev Itzkovitz and research student Shai Kaplan in Prof. Ehud Shapiro's lab in the Biological Chemistry Department and the Computer Sciences and Applied Mathematics Department

The research is funded by the Clore Center for Biological Physics; the Arie and Ida Crown Memorial Charitable Fund; the Cymerman - Jakubskind Prize; the Fusfeld Research Fund; the Henry Gutwirth Fund for Research; Ms. Sally Leafman Appelbaum of Scottsdale, Arizona; the Louis Chor Memorial Trust Fund; and the estate of Fannie Sherr, New York, New York.

Source: Weizmann Institute of Science

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