10 Best Rifle For Buffalo Hunting

Updated on: August 2022

Best Rifle For Buffalo Hunting in 2022


Shooting Buffalo Rifles of the Old West

Shooting Buffalo Rifles of the Old West
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022

Buffalo slot-Experience the true feeling and charms of the Wild West and win lot of cash in the process by playing this unique and special slot game.

Buffalo slot-Experience the true feeling and charms of the Wild West and win lot of cash in the process by playing this unique and special slot game.
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022

African Rifles and Cartridges

African Rifles and Cartridges
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022

African Rifles and Cartridges: The Experiences and Opinions of a Professional Ivory Hunter

African Rifles and Cartridges: The Experiences and Opinions of a Professional Ivory Hunter
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022

Hi Country Outdoors Big Game Hunting Pt. 1

Hi Country Outdoors Big Game Hunting Pt. 1
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • A Guide on How To Do Your Own Research on the following topics!!!!!!! A Guide on How to Pick an Outfitter; How to get started in shed antler hunting;
  • How to do research for special permit areas in the Western States; How To research new hunting areas and for non-guided hunts;
  • Hunting adventures to Africa, Alaska, Canada, Montana and New Zealand:
  • Animals on film are Grizzly Bear, Archery Canadian Moose, Dall Sheep, Mountain Caribou, Bighorn Sheep, Cape Buffalo, Zebra, Thar and Red Stag
  • Boone & Crockett, Pope & Young and SCI hunting adventures.

Ep 73 - Savage Breed

Ep 73 - Savage Breed
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022

African Big Game Hunting

African Big Game Hunting
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • lion, tiger cheetah, elephant, giraffe, zebra, wildebeast, hyena, rhino, crocodile, gazelle, water buffalo, vulture
  • hunting
  • large caliber weapons

The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America

The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022

Guns of the Old West: An Illustrated Guide (Dover Military History, Weapons, Armor)

Guns of the Old West: An Illustrated Guide (Dover Military History, Weapons, Armor)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022

Raiseek Rifle Sling Buffalo Hide Leather Sling with Swivels, Durable Gun Strap, Metal Hardware 1" Wide

Raiseek Rifle Sling Buffalo Hide Leather Sling with Swivels, Durable Gun Strap, Metal Hardware 1
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • Made of buffalo hide leather with quality stitching. It is comfortable to use for long days of hunting
  • Brown Color: Classic look and tough gun sling; The color gives it a great rustic look
  • 1 Inch wide sling; All metal hardware, Raiseek gun sling is fitted with metal hardware for a lifetime of use.
  • Real metal fasteners; The gun sling length is adjustable, and it is securely locked with a fastener
  • These metal sling swivels open/close smoothly and mount securely. Loosen the spring-loaded screw as much as it goes, then push in the screw and swing the latch to attach or detach.

The True Story of Winged Buffalo

Archaeologists studying early Native American sites in North America quickly learned about buffalo hunting methods. They soon learned why some methods failed, and the actions that were taken to improve the hunt..

The band that had managed the hunt, often with other bands of the same nation, would then skin the buffalo, and spend some time there feasting on fresh meat, and drying other meat over a fire so they would have food through the harsh winters of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain foothills. Most of the bison killed would be used; bones and scraps would be left for coyotes and wolves, but enough bones remained, with tool marks, that archaeologists could tell what had happened.

But the archaeologists soon realized that over time, back in those hunting days, the number of Bison killed grew smaller and smaller. Surely it wasn't because of a reduced population; when white men first saw buffalo on the Great Plains, they reported vast herds that covered the plains like an ocean. No, it had to have been some other reason. But what could explain this?

A clever archaeologist, Dr. Whunu Wotapand, working with a paleontologist, Dr. Ainchen Bonz, made an astonishing discovery: they found the secret sacred Bison Burial Grounds, in a remote area of Montana! And in amongst those old remains, they made an even more fascinating discovery: a heretofore unknown subspecies of bison; a subspecies with wings that were much like those of so-called "flying" squirrels. They could tell by the knobs on the leg bones where the wing tissue had attached. These buffalo didn't so much fly as soar; when the leapt off a great (or not-so-great) height, they would extend their legs to the sides, left out to the left, right to the right, and the sturdy tissue between them made a sort of glider, so that they could soar over hunters and land safely, far from danger. Dr. Wotapand christened this subspecies, which had evolved from the original Bison bison, Bison bison aviatus, or Flying Buffalo.

But why were none left when white men reached the plains? What happened to the Flying Buffalo? Dr. Wotapand worked tirelessly, examining Flying Buffalo bones wherever he found them, and it wasn't long before he found the answer. The clever Native Americans, realizing that the buffalo had changed and could no longer be killed simply by running them off a cliff, changed their tactics. Now half of the hunters, those who were the very best with bows and arrow, and with spears, hid at the bottom of the cliffs. When the Flying Buffalo took to the air off the edge, they would shoot their arrow or throw their spears up at the great beasts. Those who were hit would fall to the ground, and the nations went hungry no more. However, because the evolved subspecies didn't represent a large population of Bison bison, they were soon hunted to extinction, as perhaps the woolly mammoth had been long before them.

And how did Dr. Wotapand figure this out, you ask? Simple. He found several kill sites at the foot of cliffs where many of the buffalo, all with the knobbed legs, had arrow or spear points embedded in their chests, along with the broken bones from falling. And after the dates of those sites, the number of normal Bison bison killed merely from falling, began to steadily increase in kill sites again.

And that is the real true story of the Flying Buffalo, and what today's buffalo wings are named after.

(Note: this is purely fictional. No offense is implied or intended towards either archaeologists or Native Americans.)

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